Day 3 of Baby Loss Awareness Week: Looking after those who provide care and support and those on the frontline – Baby Loss Awareness Week

Day 3 of Baby Loss Awareness Week: Looking after those who provide care and support and those on the frontline

Day 3 Looking after those who provide care and support and those on the frontline

Day 3 of Baby Loss Awareness Week: Looking after those who provide care and support and those on the frontline

Throughout the pandemic, those working on the frontline have not only had to face the personal impact of lockdown and changing restrictions, but also its effect on the way they carry out their important jobs. Increased pressures on services, alongside the added stress restrictions have had on parents, made supportive care even more important – but with added barriers to overcome.   

“Nothing beats caring, human touch and doing that with a gloved hand, a masked and visored face, wasn’t what I wanted to offer, but I hope the families still felt well cared for during their time of need.”

Sophie, midwife 

It goes without saying that healthcare teams play a vital role in the treatment and wellbeing of families, especially when they are experiencing pregnancy and baby loss or coping with grief. 

But what about their own wellbeing? We want to recognise their strength in the last year while exploring how best to look after those who provide care and support on the frontline. 

We’re so proud of everyone who faced these challenges while continuing to provide vital care and support to families who needed it.

Bereavement midwife Amina has shared some of her top tips on how she looks after herself and her team.

Remember to take breaks: “On the ward, I work in a great team who are constantly making sure we’re taking our break. We also have a volunteer wellbeing service who visit every day with a tea trolley, offering great cakes and a chat to anyone who needs it!”

Create a safe space: “In my work with Tommy’s we refer to ourselves as ‘a cuddle of midwives’. I know I can contact any or all of the other midwives when I need advice, support or just someone to reflect with.”

Talk to each other: “What I loved about working through the pandemic, despite its challenges, was that everyone kept checking in with each other. There was a lot of care for the team and making sure we were all doing ok – and that helped greatly.” 


Many of the organisations that are part of #BLAW offer support, training and resources to health professionals.

Sands works in partnership with health professionals and others to minimise the risks of stillbirth and to ensure the families of those babies who do die receive the best possible care.

The Sands Helpline – 0808 164 3332 – provides a safe, confidential place for anyone who has been affected by the death of a baby, including healthcare professionals. The team are available to speak to from 10am to 3pm Monday to Friday and 6pm to 9pm Tuesday and Thursday evenings. You can also email the helpline team at helpline@sands.org.uk 

Tags:
No Comments

Post A Comment